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Djokovic wins mammoth Wimbledon Final that sees records tumble

Novak Djokovic has claimed his fifth Wimbledon title at the All England Club after surviving two championship points and winning in a fifth set tie-breaker against Roger Federer in what was the longest final in Wimbledon history.

It was a final that really deserved two winners but as Djokovic said post match, “Unfortunately in these kinds of matches, one of the players has to lose.”

And it was the defending champion that emerged victorious 7-6 (5), 1-6, 7-6 (4), 4-6, 13-12 (3) in a match that lasted nearly five hours.

Djokovic and Federer pushed each other to the edge in the tightest of circumstances where it became as much a test of stamina, endurance and focus as it was of skill.

The advantage and momentum of the game swung back and forth throughout with Federer falling behind and coming back multiple times before gaining the upper hand and holding two match points in the final set.

But Djokovic wasn’t done, and unbelievably, he’d done this before.

The 2010 and 2011 US Opens saw Djokovic erase two match points to defeat Federer in the semi-finals both years.

Craig Gabriel told Macquarie Sports Radio this morning that the heart-stopping, marathon of a match was a first for many reasons.

“it was the first time ever that a Wimbledon final, finals set has ended with a tie-break, it’s never happened before’, said Gabriel.

It’s the first year that a fifth set tie-break was to be introduced at 12-all; writing this epic showdown firmly into the history books.

Other records set during the grand final at the All England Tennis Club in 2019 –

– Longest final ever played at Wimbledon – 4 hours 57 minutes
– 71 years since a man saved match points to win the title
– Record 12th appearance in the Wimbledon final by Federer which is more than any other player in tournament history
– First time the final set tie-breaker was used in a Wimbledon singles match
– Djokovic is the first man in the Open Era over the age of 30 to successfully defend a Wimbledon title

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